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Posts for: March, 2019

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
March 27, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions

Achilles tendonitis doesn't just affect athletes. In fact, you can develop the painful condition even if you don't run, play basketball or participate in other types of sports. No matter what the cause of your tendon pain, the podiatrists at Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates in Achilles Tendonitis PainBoise, Nampa/Caldwell, and Meridian, ID, offer treatments that will help get you back on your feet.

What causes Achilles tendonitis?

Achilles tendonitis occur when the long thin tendon at the back of your heel becomes irritated and inflamed. The tendon connects your heel bone to the muscles in your calf and allows you to stand on your tiptoes and push off when you run, walk or jump.

The condition can be caused by:

  • The Shoes You Wear: Wearing shoes that don't adequately support or cushion your feet and arches may increase your risk of Achilles tendonitis. Do you wear high heels often? Wearing the shoes regularly can shorten your tendon, making it more likely that you'll develop tendonitis.
  • Your Sex: Men develop Achilles tendonitis more often than women.
  • Your Age: The Achilles tendon naturally weakens as you get older. Even if you've been active all of your life and stretch before activity, you can still develop the condition.
  • Your Arches: Flat foot places considerable stress on your muscles and tendons and may eventually cause Achilles tendonitis.
  • Your Favorite Sports and Activities: People who play or participate in football, running, baseball, dance, softball, tennis, volleyball, gymnastics, or other activities that require quick starts and stops are at risk of Achilles tendonitis.
  • Your Running Routine: Running uphill can strain your tendon and cause painful inflammation.
  • Your Medical Conditions: You may be at increased risk of Achilles tendonitis if you have psoriasis or high blood pressure or your Boise, Nampa/Caldwell, or Meridian podiatrist prescribes a type of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones.
  • Your Exercise Routine: Stretching before exercise can help you avoid Achilles tendonitis and is particularly important if your calf muscles tend to be tight. Other workout factors that may put you at risk include suddenly increasing the length or duration of your workout or only working out or playing sports occasionally.
  • Your Weight: Carrying extra pounds strains your tendons. Losing weight is a simple way to avoid tendonitis.

Are you tired of living with Achilles tendonitis pain? Schedule an appointment with the podiatrists at Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates by calling (208) 327-0627 for the Boise, ID, office, (208) 463-1660 for the Nampa/Caldwell office, or (208) 888-9876 for the Meridian office.


By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
March 20, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Injuries  

An unexpected fall or twist can result in an injury of the foot or ankle, such as a sprain or strain. Immediate first aid can help prevent complications, reduce pain and improve recovery.

Rest, ice, compression and elevation--commonly referred to as R.I.C.E.--is the first and best treatment for minor injuries. The following tips can aid in the early treatment of common foot and ankle injuries to help reduce swelling and control the inflammatory process during the initial phase of injury.

Rest: Whether you have a strain or a sprain, rest from any physical activity is essential to protecting your injured ligaments, tendons or muscles from further damage while your body starts the repair process.  Avoid putting weight on the injured foot or ankle as much as possible. In some cases, complete immobilization may be required.

Ice: Gently ice your foot or ankle with ice wrapped in a towel in a 20-minute-on, 40-minute-off cycle for the first few days post-injury. Ice is excellent at reducing inflammation and pain. 

Compression: Applying some type of compressive wrap or bandage to an injured area can greatly reduce the amount of initial swelling.

Elevation: Prop your foot up while lying down or sitting so that it is higher than or equal to the level of the heart.

After a few days of R.I.C.E., many acute injuries will begin to heal. If pain or swelling does not subside after a few days, or if you are unsure of the severity of your injury, make an appointment with your podiatrist. A skilled podiatrist can properly diagnose your injury and recommend the best course of treatment.


By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
March 06, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions
Is heel pain keeping you down? Pain that occurs following an injury or early in an illness may play a protective role, warning us about the damage we have suffered. SoYour Heel Pain Could Be Plantar Fasciitis what causes heel pain?
 
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition in which a band of tissue in the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, leading to severe heel pain. The pain can be so bad that it hurts to walk, much less exercise or perform daily activities. If one step causes shooting pain in your heel—especially when you first get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time—plantar fasciitis may be to blame. Contact your podiatrist immediately for proper diagnosis and treatment of your pain. 
 

Understanding Heel Pain with Help from Your Podiatrist

Plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension. This causes the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length, leading to inflammation, pain and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone.
 
Inflammation may become irritated by shoes that lack appropriate support, mainly in the arch area and by the constant irritation associated with an athletic lifestyle. Resting may provide temporary relief, but when you resume walking you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk the pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may just be a false sense of relief, as the pain will often return after prolonged rest or extensive walking.  
 
You can take steps now to avoid heel pain, including:
  • Wear shoes that fit well
  • Wear proper shoes for each activity
  • Do not wear shoes with excessive wear on heels or soles
  • Prepare properly before exercising by stretching and warming up
  • Pace yourself when you participate in athletic activities
  • Don’t underestimate your body’s need for rest and good nutrition
  • Lose excess weight
If pain and other symptoms of inflammation persist, you should limit your normal daily activities and contact your podiatrist immediately.