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Posts for category: Foot Conditions

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
April 01, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Pigeon Toes  
Pigeon ToesDo your child’s feet turn inward? If so, it’s fairly easy to tell, particularly when they walk. This condition is known as pigeon toes and it is often genetic (so if you have a family history of pigeon toes chances are more likely that your child will develop this foot problem, too).
 
How are pigeon toes diagnosed?

When you bring your child into the podiatrist’s office, the specialist will examine your child’s walk and gait. They will also observe how your child stands to see if their feet turn inwards or to look at how your child’s hips are positioned. Your podiatrist may also recommend imaging tests to look at the alignment of the bones.

While a pediatrician may be the first person to look at and diagnose your child’s pigeon toes, a pediatric podiatrist is going to be able to provide your little one with the specialized treatment and care they need.
 
How are pigeon toes treated in children?

Most parents are relieved to find out that many children grow out of mild to moderate forms of pigeon toes. While this may take a few years, this is nothing to worry about and children won’t require special treatment or care.

However, if this issue is detected in your infant, they may need to wear a cast on the feet to fix the alignment before your child begins walking. A podiatrist can also show you a series of stretches and massages that can help the bones grow into the proper alignment.

If your child’s pigeon toes are still causing them issues by 10 years old, then you may want to talk with your podiatrist about whether surgery may be necessary to correct these bone alignment issues.
While mild pigeon toes may not be a cause for concern, children with more severe cases may have trouble walking or may not be able to participate in sports. Some children may also deal with teasing due to their condition. It’s important to discuss all of these issues with your child’s podiatrist so they can help you find the right treatment option to meet your child’s needs.
 
If your child has pigeon toes, it’s best to speak with a qualified foot doctor to find out the best way to address this issue to prevent mobility issues in your growing little one. A podiatrist can easily treat pigeon toes and other foot and ankle conditions in children, teens, and adults.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
March 02, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Puncture Wound  
Puncture WoundA puncture wound in the foot occurs when you step on an object that leaves a small hole behind. One of the most common puncture wounds comes from stepping on a nail. Puncture wounds are not simply cuts and will require different treatment and care to prevent infection and other complications from occurring. If you’re dealing with a puncture wound, you probably took a trip to your local emergency room for care. Even if you’ve done this, you should still follow up with a podiatrist to make sure the wound is properly cared for and tended to.
 
Dealing with a puncture wound? Here are the steps you should take,
  • Seek immediate medical attention (head to your local ER)
  • You may need a tetanus shot if it’s been more than 10 years since your last shot
  • Schedule an appointment with your podiatrist within 24 hours of the injury
  • Your podiatrist will provide you with a variety of care instructions to keep it clean and disinfected (make sure to follow all of these instructions)
When you come into the podiatrist’s office the first thing they will do is assess the wound and make sure it is properly cleaned. They will also make sure there is no debris remaining. To clean the wound, a numbing gel may be applied to the area first. Sometimes a round of antibiotics is prescribed to prevent an infection from developing. If your podiatrist suspects that you might still have a piece of an object in the wound or that there might be bone damage, imaging tests may need to be performed.
 
You must keep off the foot so that it can fully heal. If you’ve been prescribed antibiotics, make sure to take the medication until it is finished (if you stop taking it before the medication is finished it won’t be as effective). While your foot heals you must examine it daily and look for any signs of infection. These signs include,
  • Fever
  • New or worsening pain
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Drainage
  • Skin that’s warm to the touch
It’s important to turn to a podiatrist right away to treat your puncture wound to prevent complications. A foot and ankle specialist can provide you with instructions on how to properly care for your wound to ensure that it doesn’t get infected. Seek treatment right away.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
January 15, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Sprain   Fractured Foot   Broken Bone  
Did I Break My FootWhether you took a bad tumble or your child had a rough collision while playing sports, it’s important that you do not just recognize the signs of a broken foot but that you also seek immediate medical attention. Of course, we know that it isn’t always easy to differentiate a break from a sprain. Here are some signs that your foot is broken and need to be seen by a qualified podiatrist,
  • Pain that occurs immediately after an injury or accident
  • Pain that is directly above a bone
  • Pain that is worse with movement
  • Bruising and severe swelling
  • A cracking sound at the moment of injury
  • A visible deformity or bump
  • Can’t put weight on the injured foot
If you or your child is experiencing symptoms of a fractured foot or ankle they must turn to a podiatrist for care. We can diagnose, set, and treat all types of fractures; however, if the bone is dislocated or looks severely broken (a visible bump or deformity appears on the foot) it’s a good idea to head to your local ER.
 
How can I tell the difference between a break and a sprain?

The symptoms of a sprain are far less severe. You can often put weight on the injured foot with a sprain; however, you may notice some slight pain and stiffness. You may also have heard a popping sound at the moment of the injury with a sprain, while a broken bone often produces a cracking sound. The pain associated with a sprain will also be above soft tissue rather than bone. A podiatrist will perform an X-ray to be able to determine if you are dealing with a break or a sprain.
 
How is a broken bone in the foot treated?

Rest is key to allowing an injury, particularly a fracture, to heal properly. Along with rest, your doctor may also recommend either an over-the-counter or prescription-strength pain reliever, depending on the severity of your fracture. Those with more moderate to severe fractures may require a special boot, brace, or splint. Those with more severe fractures may need to wear a cast and use crutches, so they can avoid putting any weight on the foot.
 
If you are on the fence about whether or not to see a podiatrist about your injury, why not simply give us a call? We can discuss your symptoms on the phone to determine whether we can take a wait-and-see approach or whether you need to come in right away for care.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
December 15, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
How Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects the FeetRheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common types of arthritis, and it is characterized by joint pain, inflammation, and damage. RA, like other kinds of arthritis, is progressive, which means that symptoms will gradually get worse over time if left untreated. So, how do you know if you might be developing RA in your feet? While a podiatrist can certainly provide you with a definitive diagnosis, here are some telltale signs of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • You experience pain, inflammation, and stiffness in the joints of the foot, particularly the toes
  • You experience aching feet, particularly after activity or long periods of standing
  • Some parts of your foot may feel oddly warm to the touch or may emanate heat while the rest of the foot feels normal
  • The joints of the toes and ankles may swell
Symptoms are often mild at first and you may not even think that you have arthritis. Those between the ages of 30 to 60 are more likely to develop RA. You may notice intense flare-ups that are characterized by bouts of remission (in which you don’t experience symptoms). Do not take these symptom-free moments to mean that you are fine. It’s important to see a podiatrist right away if you are experiencing any of the symptoms above.

What does RA do to the feet and ankles?

Along with painful joints and stiffness, you may also notice other changes to your feet over time. Some of these changes include,
  • Bunions
  • Corns
  • Hammertoes and claw toes
  • Bursitis
  • Circulation issues (e.g. atherosclerosis; Raynaud’s phenomena)
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?

Since RA is not curable, your podiatrist will focus on crafting a treatment plan that will help to alleviate your symptoms and slow the progression of the disease to prevent severe and irreparable joint damage. Prescription medications known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are biologics that can reduce inflammation and prevent the progression of the disease.

Of course, there are also lifestyle changes you can make along with taking prescription medication that can also ease symptoms,
  • Warm soaks
  • Custom insoles or orthotics
  • Pain relievers
  • Compression
  • Stretching exercises for the feet
  • Bracing
  • Steroid injections (for targeting severe inflammation)
Surgery is only necessary if there is severe joint or cartilage damage, or if inflamed tissue needs to be removed from around the joint.

Most people with RA will eventually develop foot and ankle problems, which is why it’s important to have a podiatrist on your team that can help you manage your RA effectively.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
November 30, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: hammertoes  

Dealing with a hammertoe? Here’s what to do about it.

It’s easy for our Boise, ID, podiatrists to be able to spot hammertoes through a simple examination. After all, the classic characteristic is a toe that is bent downward. In more serious cases the toe may look almost claw-like and be unable to straighten. If you think you may have a hammertoe, here’s what you should know,

Hammertoes are progressive

A hammertoe will not go away (unless it’s surgically repaired). In fact, this deformity (just like bunions) can get worse over time. This is why it’s important to 1. Catch a hammertoe early on when you’re still able to straighten the joint and 2. Start incorporating conservative measures and treatment options early to slow its progress.

Hammertoes typically affects the small toes

Just as a bunion typically affects the large toe joint, a hammertoe is another common foot deformity that often affects the joint of the small toes. Hammertoes often result from a muscle imbalance within the feet. By turning to your podiatrist for regular checkups, we can provide ways to prevent hammertoes from occurring such as creating prescription orthotics to correct the imbalance.

Hammertoes can be relieved through simple measures

It’s important that you are doing what you can to prevent the hammertoe from getting worse, but it is comforting to know that most discomfort can be alleviated through simple home care and lifestyle modifications. Some ways to treat a hammertoe include,

  • Strapping or tapping the toe to realign the joint
  • Performing stretching and strengthening exercises to improve the muscles of the foot
  • Wearing the proper footwear with wide toe boxes and material that is breathable and gives (e.g. leather)
  • Icing and pain relievers to tackle pain and swelling
  • Applying a non-medicated protective padding to the toe to prevent a callus from developing

Know the signs of a hammertoe

In the very early stages, it may be difficult to tell whether you are dealing with a hammertoe. You may only notice a small amount of redness, inflammation, swelling, pain or discomfort that may get worse when wearing shoes. As the joint deformity gets worse the toe will start to bend downward. You may also notice a corn or callus develop on or between the toes.

If you are concerned about hammertoes, our Boise, Nampa and Meridian, ID, podiatrists can help. Call Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates at (208) 327-0627, (208) 463-1660 or (208) 888-9876 to schedule an evaluation.