My Blog
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
January 15, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Sprain   Fractured Foot   Broken Bone  
Did I Break My FootWhether you took a bad tumble or your child had a rough collision while playing sports, it’s important that you do not just recognize the signs of a broken foot but that you also seek immediate medical attention. Of course, we know that it isn’t always easy to differentiate a break from a sprain. Here are some signs that your foot is broken and need to be seen by a qualified podiatrist,
  • Pain that occurs immediately after an injury or accident
  • Pain that is directly above a bone
  • Pain that is worse with movement
  • Bruising and severe swelling
  • A cracking sound at the moment of injury
  • A visible deformity or bump
  • Can’t put weight on the injured foot
If you or your child is experiencing symptoms of a fractured foot or ankle they must turn to a podiatrist for care. We can diagnose, set, and treat all types of fractures; however, if the bone is dislocated or looks severely broken (a visible bump or deformity appears on the foot) it’s a good idea to head to your local ER.
 
How can I tell the difference between a break and a sprain?

The symptoms of a sprain are far less severe. You can often put weight on the injured foot with a sprain; however, you may notice some slight pain and stiffness. You may also have heard a popping sound at the moment of the injury with a sprain, while a broken bone often produces a cracking sound. The pain associated with a sprain will also be above soft tissue rather than bone. A podiatrist will perform an X-ray to be able to determine if you are dealing with a break or a sprain.
 
How is a broken bone in the foot treated?

Rest is key to allowing an injury, particularly a fracture, to heal properly. Along with rest, your doctor may also recommend either an over-the-counter or prescription-strength pain reliever, depending on the severity of your fracture. Those with more moderate to severe fractures may require a special boot, brace, or splint. Those with more severe fractures may need to wear a cast and use crutches, so they can avoid putting any weight on the foot.
 
If you are on the fence about whether or not to see a podiatrist about your injury, why not simply give us a call? We can discuss your symptoms on the phone to determine whether we can take a wait-and-see approach or whether you need to come in right away for care.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
January 04, 2021
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Blisters  
What To Do About BlistersEverything from wearing shoes that are a little too loose to increasing the number of miles you run can leave you dealing with painful blisters on your feet. Blisters can be quite a nuisance, making it difficult to move around, especially when wearing shoes. If you deal with blisters rather regularly here are some simple ways to treat the problem.
 
Keep the Blister Intact

If possible, try to keep the blister intact. Do not try to pop or drain a blister that hasn’t popped on its own. It’s important not to put pressure on the blister, so avoid any shoes that may be too tight. If you’re going to put on shoes, make sure to apply a bandage (some band-aids are designed specifically for covering blisters) to the area first.
 
Keep Popped Blisters Clean

If the blister popped on its own, clean it with warm water soap (do not use alcohol or hydrogen peroxide on the blister). Once the area is clean, apply an over-the-counter antibiotic cream to the area and apply a bandage over the blister. These simple steps can prevent an infection from occurring.
 
Drain the Blister Yourself

You should only drain a blister if it’s very large, painful, or affects your ability to move. In this case, you should sterilize a needle with alcohol and then make a small hole in the blister to let it drain. You may need to carefully squeeze the blister to help it drain fully. Once the blister has drained, rinse out the area with soap and warm water before applying antibiotic cream to the area and placing a bandage over it.
 
Replace Bandages Daily

You mustn’t keep the same bandage on your blister day in and day out. You should check the blister every day to make sure it isn’t infected. You should clean the area daily with soap and water and then reapply another bandage.
 
Of course, if you have diabetes or nerve damage in your feet, you mustn't try to drain or treat the blister yourself. Even something as small as a blister could become infected or lead to serious complications. You should see your podiatrist right away for any blisters that develop on your feet.
 
If you develop signs of infection such as pus, increased redness, or swelling of the blister, you must see your podiatrist right away for treatment. While blisters aren’t usually a cause for concern in most healthy individuals, it’s also important that you practice good foot care to prevent blisters from happening.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
December 30, 2020
Category: Foot Care
Tags: ski boots   orthotics  

Protect the health of your feet and ankles all winter long with these helpful tips.

It’s beginning to look a lot like winter. While some people choose to hibernate during the colder months, there are snow bunnies and other winter lovers that enjoy the chilly, snowy days because it means more time to hit the slopes. If you are a winter sports lover, or you simply enjoy getting out into the wintry elements to enjoy the scenic views, our Boise, ID, podiatrists want to provide you with helpful advice on how to keep your feet and ankles safe and healthy during the winter.

Choose Appropriate Footwear

One of the best ways to protect your feet not just from the frigid and potentially dangerous winter elements but also from injuries is by wearing the proper shoes. When it’s icy out, people are more likely to fall, especially if they aren’t wearing the right shoes or boots.

Our Boise, ID, podiatrists see a lot of broken bones and ankle sprains due to winter accidents. It’s best to choose low-heeled shoes that offer a lot of traction. You’ll also want to choose shoes that are water-resistant and that offer the proper amount of insulation, especially if you plan to spend a lot of time outdoors.

Say “Yes” to Custom Orthotics

Many people turn to our podiatry team to get custom orthotics. Prescription orthotics are custom-made to fit your feet and provide them with additional cushioning, support and protection when standing, walking, running or participating in any activity.

We understand the abuse feet take, especially when enjoying winter activities such as skiing. Our team of podiatrists can provide you with high-quality, long-lasting orthotics made specially to fit your ski and snow boots. With custom orthotics, you can trust that you have ample protection for your feet and ankles so you can focus on enjoying your favorite winter sports.

Keep Feet Dry

Wet or damp feet, especially during the winter, can be dangerous. To protect against frostbite or even a nasty fungal infection, it’s important that you wear socks that wick moisture and can keep your feet dry. This, along with the appropriate footwear, can protect your feet from getting wet. If your feet do get wet, it’s important to take your shoes and socks off immediately once you get indoors.

If you are gearing up to go skiing or to enjoy your favorite winter sport, it’s important that you are protecting your feet and ankles from injury. If you would like to sit down with our Boise, ID, podiatrists to discuss whether custom orthotics could help you, call Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates at (208) 327-0627, (208) 463-1660 or (208) 888-9876. We provide comprehensive foot and ankle care to those living in and around Boise, Nampa/Caldwell and Meridian.

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
December 15, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions
How Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects the FeetRheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common types of arthritis, and it is characterized by joint pain, inflammation, and damage. RA, like other kinds of arthritis, is progressive, which means that symptoms will gradually get worse over time if left untreated. So, how do you know if you might be developing RA in your feet? While a podiatrist can certainly provide you with a definitive diagnosis, here are some telltale signs of rheumatoid arthritis.
  • You experience pain, inflammation, and stiffness in the joints of the foot, particularly the toes
  • You experience aching feet, particularly after activity or long periods of standing
  • Some parts of your foot may feel oddly warm to the touch or may emanate heat while the rest of the foot feels normal
  • The joints of the toes and ankles may swell
Symptoms are often mild at first and you may not even think that you have arthritis. Those between the ages of 30 to 60 are more likely to develop RA. You may notice intense flare-ups that are characterized by bouts of remission (in which you don’t experience symptoms). Do not take these symptom-free moments to mean that you are fine. It’s important to see a podiatrist right away if you are experiencing any of the symptoms above.

What does RA do to the feet and ankles?

Along with painful joints and stiffness, you may also notice other changes to your feet over time. Some of these changes include,
  • Bunions
  • Corns
  • Hammertoes and claw toes
  • Bursitis
  • Circulation issues (e.g. atherosclerosis; Raynaud’s phenomena)
How is rheumatoid arthritis treated?

Since RA is not curable, your podiatrist will focus on crafting a treatment plan that will help to alleviate your symptoms and slow the progression of the disease to prevent severe and irreparable joint damage. Prescription medications known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are biologics that can reduce inflammation and prevent the progression of the disease.

Of course, there are also lifestyle changes you can make along with taking prescription medication that can also ease symptoms,
  • Warm soaks
  • Custom insoles or orthotics
  • Pain relievers
  • Compression
  • Stretching exercises for the feet
  • Bracing
  • Steroid injections (for targeting severe inflammation)
Surgery is only necessary if there is severe joint or cartilage damage, or if inflamed tissue needs to be removed from around the joint.

Most people with RA will eventually develop foot and ankle problems, which is why it’s important to have a podiatrist on your team that can help you manage your RA effectively.
By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
December 14, 2020
Category: Foot Care
Tags: flat feet  

Are the pains in your heel or the ball of your foot interfering with your life? Flat feet can make getting out of bed, dancing, exercise, and walking seem quite difficult to do. Our care providers at Idaho Foot and Ankle Associates can help alleviate your discomfort in Boise, ID.
 

What is the cause of flat feet?

Flat feet can be hereditary, the result of wearing ill-fitting shoes over a long period, or a symptom of another condition like tendonitis. Obesity, diabetes, and pregnancy also contribute to flat feet.
 

Find relief for your flat feet in several ways:

  • Getting physical therapy entails a custom course of hot and cold treatments, exercises, and manual manipulation to strengthen the muscles of the foot.
  • Wearing orthopedic footwear can support the foot and relieve any pain. Your foot is working hard to pull up the arch, so custom made insteps assist with absorbing the impact of your steps.
  • Some patients have pain they can’t seem to resolve. In this case, surgery may be a viable option for realigning your foot and restoring function.
  • Exercising your foot by yourself is simple. Simple movements like pointing and flexing the foot, grabbing things, and standing on your tiptoes can change the shape and function of the foot.
  • If you are diabetic or have another condition that affects the feet, it is best to try to manage those conditions as much as possible.
  • You may take over the counter meds for sporadic pain, but more chronic discomforts may require a visit to the doctor.

Dreading activities like a hike doesn’t have to be a way of life. The staff at Idaho Foot and Ankle Associates can answer any questions you may have about therapy, exercise or reconstructive surgery.  Call (208) 327-0627 to reach our Boise, ID, office, (208) 463-1660 for our Nampa/Caldwell, ID, office, and (208) 888-9876 for our Meridian, ID, office.





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