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By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
October 19, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Warts  

What Causes Warts?

Got foot warts? Nearly everyone will have a wart at some point in their lives. Warts are typically small, hard skin growths caused by an infection with humanpallilloma virus. Foot warts are treatable. Foot warts are among the most common dermatologic conditions podiatrists treat. Read on to learn about the causes of warts.

An HPV Infection

Common warts are caused by by an HPV infection. Over 100 types of HPV exist. Certain types of HPV infection cause cervical cancer. Some types of HPV infection cause foot warts, while others cause warts that appear on the face, neck, or hands. Of the 100 types of HPV, about 60 cause common warts on areas such as the hands or feet.

Skin-To-Skin Contact

Wart viruses are contagious. You can get foot warts from skin-to-skin contact with people who have warts. However, not all HPV strains are highly contagious. You can get the wart virus by touching an object that another person's wart touched, such as clothing, towels, shoes, or exercise equipment.


Breaks in Your Skin

HPV infects the top layer of skin and usually enters the body in an area of damaged or cut skin. Cuts from shaving can provide an avenue for infection. Getting a scrape can also bring on common warts. Foot warts are very common in swimmers whose feet are scratched by rough pool surfaces.

A Weak Immune System

In most cases, your immune system defeats an HPV infection before it creates a wart. Someone with a weakened immune system is more vulnerable and therefore more likely to develop warts. Immune systems can be weakened by HIV or by immunosuppressant drugs used after organ transplants.


If you want to get rid of foot warts, see your podiatrist as soon as possible. Many types of effective wart treatments are available. They include salicylic acid, cantharidin, cryotherapy, laser treatment, and surgery. Your podiatrist can help you get rid of foot warts once and for all!

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
October 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care

Find out what might be going on to cause your heel pain and how to treat it.

Heel pain is a common complaint that our Boise, Nampa/Caldwell, and Meridan, ID, podiatrists can help treat. Of course, it’s particularly common for most runners and athletes to experience heel pain at some point during their lifetime. So, what could be causing your Heel Painsymptoms and when does it a warrant a trip to see a doctor?

The specific location of your heel pain will give us some insight into what might be going on. For example, if the pain is under the heel then chances are good that your heel pain is the result of an inflammatory problem known as plantar fasciitis. This is usually the most common cause of heel pain. If the pain is above the heel bone or on the back of the heel then you could have Achilles tendinitis.

Both of these conditions usually appear gradually over time rather than as a result of an injury. You may barely notice these symptoms at first until they progress. Both conditions are the result of overuse, which is why both conditions are common in athletes. If you have suddenly increased the intensity or duration of your workout then you may put yourself at an increased risk for developing this problem.

When heel pain occurs it’s up to you to stay off your feet as much as possible and to take it easy. If you continue to run or workout you won’t give the inflamed tissue ample time to heal. The best thing you can do is to avoid high-impact activities until the pain has completely subsided.

Along with heel pain, it’s not uncommon to experience stiffness as well, particularly first thing in the morning when getting out of bed. This is usually when foot pain is at its worse, too. If you have Achilles tendinitis, these symptoms may be exacerbated after climbing stairs or standing for long periods of time. With plantar fasciitis you may be lulled into a false sense of security by not experiencing pain during your normal workout; however, the aching or stabbing pain often appears shortly after.

Treating Heel Pain

While plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinitis are the two most common causes of heel pain, they aren’t the only causes. This is why you should visit our Boise, Nampa/Caldwell, and Meridan, ID, foot doctor if you experiencing foot pain, especially for the first time. Patients who have diabetes or nerve damage in their feet should immediately seek care from a foot specialist.

You can ask your podiatrist about certain foot stretches you can do every day to help reduce stiffness and pain while improving mobility.

We may also recommend:

  • Physical therapy
  • Night Splints
  • Steroid Injections
  • Orthotics
  • Surgery (in persistent cases)

Heel pain isn’t something that you can treat by yourself. If you are dealing with sudden, severe or persistent foot problems then it’s time to turn to the foot care specialists at Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates in Boise, Nampa/Caldwell, and Meridan, ID. Call us today to learn more about how we can help you.

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
October 05, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: heel spurs   Heel Pain  

Have you been experiencing any heel pain or bothersome tenderness without any obvious cause? Although heel spurs themselves sometimes do not cause acute discomfort, they are frequently associated with the painful inflammation known as plantar fasciitis, a condition commonly described as feeling like a knife is wrenching through your foot. Read below for more information on the typical causes, symptoms, and treatments of heel spurs.

What is a Heel Spur?

A heel spur is often the result of overstraining foot muscles and ligaments, overstretching the plantar fascia (the thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes), and repeatedly tearing the heel bone membrane. From these actions arises a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone. Risk factor for developing the condition include:

  • Possessing any walking gait abnormalities

  • Regularly running or jogging on hard surfaces

  • Wearing poorly fitted or overly worn shoes

  • Wearing shoes that lack arch support

  • Being excessively overweight or obese

What are The Symptoms?

Heel spurs do not carry many symptoms by themselves. However, they are often related to other afflictions, most typically plantar fasciitis. The most common sign of this combo of conditions is a feeling of chronic pain along the bottom or back of the heel, especially during periods of walking, running, or jogging. If you are experiencing this recurring inflammation, it is a good idea to visit your local podiatrist's office and inquire about undergoing an x-ray or ultrasound examination of the foot.

What are the Treatment Options?

The solutions to heel spurs are generally centered around decreasing inflammation and avoiding re-injury. They include:

  • Applying ice on the inflammation

  • Performing stretch exercises

  • Wearing orthotic devices or shoe inserts to relieve pressure off of the spur

  • Taking anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen to relieve pain

  • In extreme cases, surgery can be performed on chronically inflamed spurs

If you are dealing with symptoms of heel spurs or pain in your feet, turn to a podiatrist so that we can get you back on your feet. Don't ignore your pain.

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
August 15, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s important to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.

By Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates
August 02, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: bunions  

Do you know why you have bunions and what you can do to relieve your pain? Foot doctors provide a variety of treatment options for thebunions common foot condition. In addition to treating bunions, the podiatrists at Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates in Boise, Nampa/Caldwell, and Meridan, ID, offer skilled care for a variety of foot and ankle conditions.

Why do I have a bunion?

Bunions can be caused by:

  • Shoe Choices: Tight shoes and high heels increase pressure on the joints of your feet. If you wear these types of shoes often, the joint at the base of your big toe may eventually become misaligned, resulting in bunions.
  • Genetics: You may be more likely to develop bunions in someone else in your family has them. Although bunions themselves aren't inherited, you can inherit a foot imbalance that increases your risk of developing bunions.
  • Arthritis: People who have rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or osteoarthritis are also at increased risk of developing bunions.
  • Foot Abnormalities: High arches, low arches, excessive pronation, or any condition that affects the structure or alignment of your foot can raise your chance of bunions.
  • Uneven Leg Length: Is one of your legs a little longer than the other? Leg length discrepancies can cause gait problems, which may be a factor in the development of bunions.
  • Lifestyle Factors: Jobs or hobbies that require long hours on your feet can up your bunion risk.

How are bunions treated?

Bunion treatment is aimed at reducing pain and slowing the progression of your bunion. Over-the-counter pain relievers and wearing wider shoes can be helpful in easing pain. If you have corns and calluses, apply adhesive pads to reduce friction on your toes and feet. Your Boise, Nampa/Caldwell or Meridan, ID, podiatrist can offer other treatment options and strategies, including night splints, orthotics, and cortisone injections for pain. When pain is severe, or your bunions interfere with your daily activities, bunion removal surgery may be recommended.

Ease your bunion pain with a visit to the foot doctor. Schedule an appointment with the podiatrists at Idaho Foot & Ankle Associates by calling (208) 327-0627 for the Boise, ID, office, (208) 463-1660 for the Nampa/Caldwell, ID, office, or (208) 888-9876 for the Meridan, ID, office.





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